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24

Nov 2015

World Bank Report: Climate Change Needs To Be Addressed In Order To Deal With Poverty

24 November 2015 | Posted by HLindon

Climate change needs to be addressed in an effective fashion in order to deal with the issue of poverty, according to a new report from the World Bank. The report notes that all of the "hard-won gains" of recent decades could be lost, and that over 100 million more people could be pushed into poverty by the year 2030 without rapid, effective "climate-smart development programs."

povertyAccording to the report, around 36% of the planet's human population lived in poverty in 1991, as compared to around 10% now (according to the report). The report argues that, without real efforts to rapidly reduce greenhouse gas emissions, this progress will be undone.

As it stands, poor people the world over are already at risk from climate change induced issues -- such as food price spikes, disease outbreaks, and extreme weather events. With continuing greenhouse gas emissions, these issues will continue to grow in intensity -- with more and more people pushed back into poverty (or starvation) as a result.

The president of the World Bank, Jim Yong Kim, commented: "This report sends a clear message that ending poverty will not be possible unless we take strong action to reduce the threat of climate change on poor people and dramatically reduce harmful emissions. Climate change hits the poorest the hardest, and our challenge now is to protect tens of millions of people from falling into extreme poverty because of a changing climate."

The findings of the report are the result of an analysis using data from 92 different countries, as well as climate change modeling data.

Unsurprisingly, one of the main possible drivers of climate change induced poverty is the impact that climate change will have on agriculture. Sub-Saharan Africa, in particular, is notably vulnerable to food price issues resulting from agricultural productivity dropping.

The countries that are most at risk should be developing "climate-smart" development models, according to the report.

Image by M M (some rights reserved)

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World Bank Report: Climate Change Needs To Be Addressed In Order To Deal With Poverty

24 Nov 2015 | Posted by HLindon

Climate change needs to be addressed in an effective fashion in order to deal with the issue of poverty, according to a new report from the World Bank. The report notes that all of the "hard-won gains" of recent decades could be lost, and that over 100 million more people could be pushed into poverty by the year 2030 without rapid, effective "climate-smart development programs."

povertyAccording to the report, around 36% of the planet's human population lived in poverty in 1991, as compared to around 10% now (according to the report). The report argues that, without real efforts to rapidly reduce greenhouse gas emissions, this progress will be undone.

As it stands, poor people the world over are already at risk from climate change induced issues -- such as food price spikes, disease outbreaks, and extreme weather events. With continuing greenhouse gas emissions, these issues will continue to grow in intensity -- with more and more people pushed back into poverty (or starvation) as a result.

The president of the World Bank, Jim Yong Kim, commented: "This report sends a clear message that ending poverty will not be possible unless we take strong action to reduce the threat of climate change on poor people and dramatically reduce harmful emissions. Climate change hits the poorest the hardest, and our challenge now is to protect tens of millions of people from falling into extreme poverty because of a changing climate."

The findings of the report are the result of an analysis using data from 92 different countries, as well as climate change modeling data.

Unsurprisingly, one of the main possible drivers of climate change induced poverty is the impact that climate change will have on agriculture. Sub-Saharan Africa, in particular, is notably vulnerable to food price issues resulting from agricultural productivity dropping.

The countries that are most at risk should be developing "climate-smart" development models, according to the report.

Image by M M (some rights reserved)

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